One Of Spain’s Most Prized Cheeses.. Mahón-Menorca Cheese – PerishableNews (press release) (registration)


by Mahon-Menorca Cheese
Posted: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 3:33PM EDT


MENORCA, SPAIN –  It’s never too early to start thinking about the holidays and what delicious foods you plan to serve to friends and family. Now, if you really want to impress your friends and family, treat them with the world renowned Mahón-Menorca Cheese from Spain. Mahón-Menorca Cheese is crafted to the highest standards using a unique process handed down by centuries of meticulous care, time and knowledge.


Mahón-Menorca Cheese is produced on the island of Menorca, one of Spain’s Balearic Islands. A paradisiacal Biosphere Reserve island (certified by the UNESCO) located in the Mediterranean Sea. Mahón–Menorca Cheese is a Protected Destination of Origin (P.D.O.) cheese based upon the geographic and distinct climate factors including its temperature, humidity, light, wind and salty pastures, and its ancient farming methods mastered by generations of the Menorca family farms. Made from menorcan cow’s milk (pasteurized or raw), exclusively matured on the island of Menorca.


A very versatile cheese, often grated and used for topping pasta, rice and vegetable dishes or eaten sliced thin and drizzled with extra virgin olive oil. A must on the traditional Spanish cheese table. The cheese is also delicious with vegetables (aubergine or tomatoes), or used as a stuffing or filling (cannelloni or peppers). Also, mixed with breadcrumbs in breading and frying. The less matured Mahón-Menorca Cheeses go fantastically well white and young red wines, while the more aged cheeses are better suited for mature wines.


Mahón-Menorca Cheese has three degrees of maturity;


  • TENDER- SOFT – 21-60 days – Yellowish-white in color, with very little developed rind, soft and creamy in texture. The flavor, milky with a slight reminiscence of butter and slightly acidulous touch, a lightly sharp flavor which is characteristic of Mahón-Menorca cheese. 

  • SEMI-CURED 2-5 months – Characteristic and unmistakable. The rind, orange in color. A firm cheese yet easy to cut, showing an ivory yellow-color and a number of holes distributed in an irregular manner, depending on the piece. The milky taste and flavors are more developed, with slight buttery reminiscences of toasted nuts and dried fruit (hazelnut); a moderately persistent aftertaste, having developed the typical bouquet of the Mahón-Menorca cheese. 

  • CURED – HARD – More than 5 months – A delicacy for cheese lovers. The texture is firmer and hard; less creamy and in advanced stages of maturity, it breaks flaking. It has a very developed flavor and aroma, complex and intense, with a long persistent aftertaste. Brittle and flaks when sliced. The taste and aroma are very developed, complex and intense. Hints of old wood, tanned leather or a wine cellar, usually with a slight spicy nuance. 


When purchasing Mahón-Menorca Cheese, consumers are supporting the viable economic livelihood of the Menorca farmers and promoting a sustainable agricultural environment for future generations. 


Mahón-Menorca Cheese can be purchased nationwide at Whole Foods, and at other fine retailers such as Fairway Markets, Saveway, Kroger, Murray’s, Central Markets, Costco, Gourmet Garage, West Side Markets, Zabar’s, Central and Town & Country Markets and at the best specialty stores all over the country.


For more information on how your store can sell Mahón–Menorca Cheeses in the United States contact Richard Kessler at 973.417.8890 or email him at r.kessler@specialities.com.


About Mahon-Menorca Cheese


Mahón–Menorca Cheese is one of Spain’s most prized Cheeses. It’s produced on the island of Menorca, one of Spain’s Balearic Islands. A Biosphere Reserve island (certified by the UNESCO) located in the Mediterranean Sea. Mahón–Menorca Cheese is a Protected Destination of Origin (P.D.O.) cheese based upon the geographic and distinct climate factors including its temperature, humidity, light, wind and salty pastures, and its ancient farming methods mastered by generations of the Menorca family farms. Made from menorcan cow’s milk (pasteurized or raw), exclusively matured on the island of Menorca, Mahon-Menorca Cheese has three degrees of maturity; Tender – 21-60 days, Semi-Cured – 2-5 months and Vintage or Matured – more than five months. A very versatile cheese, it is often grated and used for topping pasta, rice and vegetable dishes or eaten sliced thin and drizzled with extra virgin olive oil. This is a must on the traditional Spanish cheese table. By purchasing Mahón-Menorca Cheese, you are supporting the viable economic livelihood of our farmers and promoting a sustainable agricultural environment. Mahón-Menorca Cheeses are positioned for retail markets nationwide such as Supermarkets, Independent Supermarkets, Gourmet Food Stores and Club Stores that seek to provide their consumers with a unique cheese experience. For more information regarding Mahón-Menorca Cheese, contact Richard Kessler at 973.417.8890 or email him at r.kessler@specialities.com.


Source: Mahon-Menorca Cheese

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One Of Spain’s Most Prized Cheeses.. Mahón-Menorca Cheese – PerishableNews (press release) (registration)


by Mahon-Menorca Cheese
Posted: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 3:33PM EDT


MENORCA, SPAIN –  It’s never too early to start thinking about the holidays and what delicious foods you plan to serve to friends and family. Now, if you really want to impress your friends and family, treat them with the world renowned Mahón-Menorca Cheese from Spain. Mahón-Menorca Cheese is crafted to the highest standards using a unique process handed down by centuries of meticulous care, time and knowledge.


Mahón-Menorca Cheese is produced on the island of Menorca, one of Spain’s Balearic Islands. A paradisiacal Biosphere Reserve island (certified by the UNESCO) located in the Mediterranean Sea. Mahón–Menorca Cheese is a Protected Destination of Origin (P.D.O.) cheese based upon the geographic and distinct climate factors including its temperature, humidity, light, wind and salty pastures, and its ancient farming methods mastered by generations of the Menorca family farms. Made from menorcan cow’s milk (pasteurized or raw), exclusively matured on the island of Menorca.


A very versatile cheese, often grated and used for topping pasta, rice and vegetable dishes or eaten sliced thin and drizzled with extra virgin olive oil. A must on the traditional Spanish cheese table. The cheese is also delicious with vegetables (aubergine or tomatoes), or used as a stuffing or filling (cannelloni or peppers). Also, mixed with breadcrumbs in breading and frying. The less matured Mahón-Menorca Cheeses go fantastically well white and young red wines, while the more aged cheeses are better suited for mature wines.


Mahón-Menorca Cheese has three degrees of maturity;


  • TENDER- SOFT – 21-60 days – Yellowish-white in color, with very little developed rind, soft and creamy in texture. The flavor, milky with a slight reminiscence of butter and slightly acidulous touch, a lightly sharp flavor which is characteristic of Mahón-Menorca cheese. 

  • SEMI-CURED 2-5 months – Characteristic and unmistakable. The rind, orange in color. A firm cheese yet easy to cut, showing an ivory yellow-color and a number of holes distributed in an irregular manner, depending on the piece. The milky taste and flavors are more developed, with slight buttery reminiscences of toasted nuts and dried fruit (hazelnut); a moderately persistent aftertaste, having developed the typical bouquet of the Mahón-Menorca cheese. 

  • CURED – HARD – More than 5 months – A delicacy for cheese lovers. The texture is firmer and hard; less creamy and in advanced stages of maturity, it breaks flaking. It has a very developed flavor and aroma, complex and intense, with a long persistent aftertaste. Brittle and flaks when sliced. The taste and aroma are very developed, complex and intense. Hints of old wood, tanned leather or a wine cellar, usually with a slight spicy nuance. 


When purchasing Mahón-Menorca Cheese, consumers are supporting the viable economic livelihood of the Menorca farmers and promoting a sustainable agricultural environment for future generations. 


Mahón-Menorca Cheese can be purchased nationwide at Whole Foods, and at other fine retailers such as Fairway Markets, Saveway, Kroger, Murray’s, Central Markets, Costco, Gourmet Garage, West Side Markets, Zabar’s, Central and Town & Country Markets and at the best specialty stores all over the country.


For more information on how your store can sell Mahón–Menorca Cheeses in the United States contact Richard Kessler at 973.417.8890 or email him at r.kessler@specialities.com.


About Mahon-Menorca Cheese


Mahón–Menorca Cheese is one of Spain’s most prized Cheeses. It’s produced on the island of Menorca, one of Spain’s Balearic Islands. A Biosphere Reserve island (certified by the UNESCO) located in the Mediterranean Sea. Mahón–Menorca Cheese is a Protected Destination of Origin (P.D.O.) cheese based upon the geographic and distinct climate factors including its temperature, humidity, light, wind and salty pastures, and its ancient farming methods mastered by generations of the Menorca family farms. Made from menorcan cow’s milk (pasteurized or raw), exclusively matured on the island of Menorca, Mahon-Menorca Cheese has three degrees of maturity; Tender – 21-60 days, Semi-Cured – 2-5 months and Vintage or Matured – more than five months. A very versatile cheese, it is often grated and used for topping pasta, rice and vegetable dishes or eaten sliced thin and drizzled with extra virgin olive oil. This is a must on the traditional Spanish cheese table. By purchasing Mahón-Menorca Cheese, you are supporting the viable economic livelihood of our farmers and promoting a sustainable agricultural environment. Mahón-Menorca Cheeses are positioned for retail markets nationwide such as Supermarkets, Independent Supermarkets, Gourmet Food Stores and Club Stores that seek to provide their consumers with a unique cheese experience. For more information regarding Mahón-Menorca Cheese, contact Richard Kessler at 973.417.8890 or email him at r.kessler@specialities.com.


Source: Mahon-Menorca Cheese

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Azzurra wins only race on opeing day of Menorca TP52 Super … – My Sailing

(Tuesday 19th September, Menorca) – A complicated, challenging weather situation resulted in just one race being sailed on the opening day of the 52 SUPER SERIES’ season decider – the Menorca 52 SUPER SERIES Sailing Week – but a confident win for circuit leaders, Azzurra sees them open their overall margin to eight points on Platoon and ten points on Quantum Racing.

Big, bumpy, leftover seas were out of proportion to the 10-12kt N’ly winds that swung around in direction, and rose, and fell in strength. Race Officer Maria Torrijo and her team achieved one good, solid race before the winds became too unstable for a second contest, and the 11-boat fleet was returned to shore.

Azzurra led at the top mark and extended away to be, at one point, over 300-metres ahead of second-placed Gladiator. But in the changeable conditions, it appeared that no lead was impregnable. Indeed, that margin appeared to shrink substantially down the second run as Takashi Okura’s Sled seemed to enjoy a big gain on the left of the run, but Azzurra slid through to win with Tony Langley’s Gladiator second and Sled third.

Quantum Racing, the defending 2016 champions, did not get off the start line as they would have wanted and could only round the first windward mark deep in the pack, in ninth. But under the guidance of Terry Hutchinson and strategist Michele Ivaldi, Quantum Racing gained to sixth by the leeward gate, gybing early and profiting on the left of the run. They then reaped a nice reward with an excellent second beat, which got Quantum Racing to fourth by the last top turn.

World Champions Platoon were not able to come back as well as rivals Quantum Racing, Harm Müller-Spreer’s crew crossing the finish line in sixth, not able to impose themselves after their start and conservative first beat.

Azzurra’s Vasco Vascotto was pleased to have added to their points buffer, but he was keeping his emotions in check, pledging to move swiftly onto tomorrow’s races. The forecast appears more promising, and with an 1100hrs warning signal, the objective is to get the regatta back on schedule and try for three races.

Vascotto commented: “The reality is that this is just one race and we need to move on quickly, to move our focus to tomorrow and to be ready to do the same things we did well today. So Guille (Parada, skipper-helm) made a good start and drove the boat well in these difficult conditions. The guys did what they had to do exactly right, it was a fantastic race for us. It is one day less, one day closer to the end of the season, and we put a couple more points on them. That is the reality. But we move on, we need to focus on just doing the same again tomorrow.”

The fleet stayed out for more than one hour after the finish of Race 1, but the breeze proved too unsettled and no further racing was possible.

Standings after one race Menorca 52 SUPER SERIES Sailing Week
1. Azzurra (Family Roemmers, ITA/ARG), (1) 1 point.
2. Gladiator (Tony Langley, GBR) (2) 2 pts
3. Sled (Takashi Okura, USA), (3) 3 pts.
4. Quantum Racing (Doug DeVos, USA), (4) 4 pts.
5. Provezza (Ergin Imre, TUR) (5) 5 pts.
6. Platoon (Harm Müller-Spreer, GER), (6) 6 pts.
7. Rán Racing (Niklas Zennström, SWE), (7) 7 pts.
8. Paprec Recyclage (Jean-Luc Petithuguenin, FRA) (8) 8 pts.
9. Bronenosec (Vladimir Liubomirov, RUS), (9) 9 pts.
10. Alegre (Andrés Soriano GBR/USA) (10) 10 p.
11. Sorcha (Peter Harrison GBR) (11) 11 p.

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52 Super Series Sailing Week Menorca – One step closer? – Sail World (press release)


52 Super Series Sailing Week Menorca – One step closer?


by 52 Super Series today at 6:13 pm




Day 1 – 52 Super Series Sailing Week Menorca © Nico Martinez / Martinez Studio




Auckland On the Water Boat Show 250



A complicated, challenging weather situation resulted in just one race being sailed on the opening day of the 52 Super Series’ season decider – the Menorca 52 Super Series Sailing Week – but a confident win for circuit leaders, Azzurra sees them open their overall margin to eight points on Platoon and ten points on Quantum Racing.

Big, bumpy, leftover seas were out of proportion to the 10-12kt N’ly winds that swung around in direction, and rose, and fell in strength. Race Officer Maria Torrijo and her team achieved one good, solid race before the winds became too unstable for a second contest, and the 11-boat fleet was returned to shore.

Azzurra led at the top mark and extended away to be, at one point, over 300-metres ahead of second-placed Gladiator. But in the changeable conditions, it appeared that no lead was impregnable. Indeed, that margin appeared to shrink substantially down the second run as Takashi Okura’s Sled seemed to enjoy a big gain on the left of the run, but Azzurra slid through to win with Tony Langley’s Gladiator second and Sled third.

Quantum Racing, the defending 2016 champions, did not get off the start line as they would have wanted and could only round the first windward mark deep in the pack, in ninth. But under the guidance of Terry Hutchinson and strategist Michele Ivaldi, Quantum Racing gained to sixth by the leeward gate, gybing early and profiting on the left of the run. They then reaped a nice reward with an excellent second beat, which got Quantum Racing to fourth by the last top turn.
World Champions Platoon were not able to come back as well as rivals Quantum Racing, Harm Müller-Spreer’s crew crossing the finish line in sixth, not able to impose themselves after their start and conservative first beat.

Day 1 – Azzurra charge ahead in the title fight – 52 Super Series Sailing Week Menorca ©  Nico Martinez / Martinez Studio
Day 1 – Azzurra charge ahead in the title fight – 52 Super Series Sailing Week Menorca © Nico Martinez / Martinez Studio

Azzurra’s Vasco Vascotto was pleased to have added to their points buffer, but he was keeping his emotions in check, pledging to move swiftly onto tomorrow’s races. The forecast appears more promising, and with an 1100hrs warning signal, the objective is to get the regatta back on schedule and try for three races.

Vascotto commented:

“The reality is that this is just one race and we need to move on quickly, to move our focus to tomorrow and to be ready to do the same things we did well today. So Guille (Parada, skipper-helm) made a good start and drove the boat well in these difficult conditions. The guys did what they had to do exactly right, it was a fantastic race for us. It is one day less, one day closer to the end of the season, and we put a couple more points on them. That is the reality. But we move on, we need to focus on just doing the same again tomorrow.”

The fleet stayed out for more than one hour after the finish of race one, but the breeze proved too unsettled and no further racing was possible.

Standings after one race Menorca 52 Super Series Sailing Week

1. Azzurra (Family Roemmers, ITA/ARG), (1) 1 point.
2. Gladiator (Tony Langley, GBR) (2) 2 pts
3. Sled (Takashi Okura, USA), (3) 3 pts.
4. Quantum Racing (Doug DeVos, USA), (4) 4 pts.
5. Provezza (Ergin Imre, TUR) (5) 5 pts.
6. Platoon (Harm Müller-Spreer, GER), (6) 6 pts.
7. Rán Racing (Niklas Zennström, SWE), (7) 7 pts.
8. Paprec Recyclage (Jean-Luc Petithuguenin, FRA) (8) 8 pts.
9. Bronenosec (Vladimir Liubomirov, RUS), (9) 9 pts.
10. Alegre (Andrés Soriano GBR/USA) (10) 10 p.
11. Sorcha (Peter Harrison GBR) (11) 11 p.


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Menorca 52 Super Series Sailing Week – Looking to end on a high note – Sail World (press release)


Menorca 52 Super Series Sailing Week – Looking to end on a high note


by 52 Super Series on 18 Sep




Menorca 52 Super Series Sailing Week © Nico Martinez / Martinez Studio




Wichard - Profurl 300x250



As the 11 teams in Mahón, Menorca anticipate the first races of the 52 Super Series season finale, Menorca 52 Super Series Sailing Week, a breezy official practice race was abandoned by all today as prudence took precedence in advance of Tuesday’s first points races at the six-regatta season’s decisive final event.

The fleet did sail the first upwind and a long downwind of a new course format which is being trialled in advance of next season and the new configuration is already finding favour with the teams. After a conventional upwind leg of around two miles there follows a long downwind of around four miles with a gate midway down the leg which brings the fleet back together.

For today’s practice race in 25kts and building seas, there was sufficient high speed excitement before the fleet converged at the leeward gate in close formation before the decision was taken to file back to the 52 Super Series race dock in Mahón in order to preserve boats and crews in the best possible condition.

On Bronenosec, Italy’s Francesco Bruni, who sailed the last America’s Cup with Artemis Racing, is delighted to be back with the TP52 Class. He, like many others around the race village in Mahòn sees a rosy future for the 52 Super Series and the TP52 Class.

“I think now everybody is looking now at monohull sailing ahead for the next three or four years. Now we are all looking what is going to happen next season. I think it is a good choice to change things back to monohulls as long as it is high tech and there is something new there. The America’s Cup always needs to be at the leading edge of technology developments. I think giving a push to the monohull world again is good. Me, I have done some Melges 20, some RC44, and now this since the Cup and I am loving it. I still love it.”

After the rain cleared, the rainbow appeared – 52 Super Series Sailing Week ©  Nico Martinez / Martinez Studio
After the rain cleared, the rainbow appeared – 52 Super Series Sailing Week © Nico Martinez / Martinez Studio

Bruni steps into the strategist’s role with the team, which lies sixth overall, ready to challenge Rán Racing for fifth and even Provezza for fourth. Tommaso Chieffi moves to the role of afterguard coach with Morgan Larson back as tactician.
“Once again, I am back again and it feels great especially on a day like this, sailing in 25kts here in the TP52s remains something very special and exciting. It is nice. You feel safe but still have a lot of fun. The fleet is better than ever, 11 boats at a very high level.”

On Provezza, winners of the last regatta in Puerto Portals, navigator Nacho Postigo – who has been with the class since its inception in 2005 – also sees a strong future for the class and the circuit:

“The 52 Super Series is the best way to prepare the America’s Cup as a team. The rumour every day is stronger, so it looks like it will be a race in monohulls. The best platform to train for this new Cup will be in the 52 Super Series and that will surely make the fleet grow next year, I’m sure. In fact this week we have already seen some different representatives around the dock here asking if different boats are sold. There is a lot of interest right now!”

Mahón proved a challenging, interesting venue last year when the 52 Super Series visited for the TP52 World Championship, the penultimate regatta of the season. And this coming week it looks like there will be a whole variety of wind and weather conditions on offer to ensure the showdown regatta delivers deserving champions. Azzurra goes into this last regatta leading by three points from Platoon with Quantum Racing three more points behind.

Francesco Bruni joins Bronenosec Gazprom as Strategist – 52 Super Series Sailing Week ©  Nico Martinez / Martinez Studio
Francesco Bruni joins Bronenosec Gazprom as Strategist – 52 Super Series Sailing Week © Nico Martinez / Martinez Studio

Rán Racing’s Steve Hayles outlines the weather outlook:

”This week we will see everything, a little bit of everything. Later today we see this big front come through and the wind go into the north, that will kick off a big sea state and it will not be too windy tomorrow. We can see rain and lightning coming in tonight, probably a big leftover sea state Tuesday. Then, after that, a real mixed bag of weather, a mix of the northerlies and the southerlies. It will be an interesting week. It will not be the same any two days.”

And Rán are out to win, as they did in Porto Cervo.

“For us we are here to deal with the regatta and not think about the season. We just want to put together our best five days sailing and get the best possible result. However and whatever that means for our overall then it will be what it will be. Our total focus is on this regatta.”

The Menorca 52 Super Series Sailing Week will take place from 19-23 September.


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Water, fire and stone: Spain’s beguiling island of Menorca – News-Herald.com




The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.

The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.
Albert Stumm via AP





MENORCA, Spain >> Locals say Menorca can be reduced to three words: water, fire and stone.


The Spanish island’s three essential elements are embodied in Cova d’en Xoroi, a natural cave that houses a sophisticated lounge halfway down a cliff. As the sun dips into the Mediterranean, waves crash on the rocks below and selfie-snapping patrons burn the same roasted-orange color as the sun-bleached limestone. Then the staff lights torches under the craggy roof, and the stunning yet laid-back venue transitions into a lively night club.


Although the scene may sound as summery as a frozen mojito, it’s repeated nightly well into autumn, when Menorca remains as beguiling as it is in peak season. Through much of October, it’s still warm enough to enjoy the spectacular beaches, but visitors will find the island has plenty to offer besides sun and transparent blue waters.


Here’s a quick look at Menorca and its vibrant cities, Mahon and Ciutadella, at a time of year when you just might have them to yourself.



NATURE VS. NURTURE

Menorca is the farthest east of the Balearics, an archipelago between Spain and Italy that includes the better-known islands of Mallorca and jet-set Ibiza. All three enjoy an enviably mild climate in a picture-postcard setting, but Menorca’s comes without the crowds or the 50-euro club cover charges. It has managed to hold on to an understated, calmer style by restricting development to a few existing, mostly low-rise resorts.


The entire 270-square-mile island was declared a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1993, and as a result, most of the 125 beaches that encircle Menorca’s jagged coastline have very little, if any, development.


Along the south coast, walking paths that start at inland parking lots wind through forested ravines to the beaches. Cala Mitjana’s powdery white sand is surrounded by cliffs, and the calm, shallow water makes it easy to explore a cave and the rocky crags with snorkeling gear. In the north, Cala Cavalleria is a little easier to get to but no less unspoiled.


The water may feel warm into autumn, but visiting after the peak summer months also means paying half-price for activities like hiring a boat with a private captain. Just plan ahead and check the weather for wind as well as temperatures.


CULTURAL LEGACIES

The ancient Phoenicians called it “Nura,” or the Island of Fire. Legend has it that passing sailors saw bonfires built along the southern cliffs, which the original inhabitants used to signal each other. Signs of those first settlers — Iberian tribes that came from the mainland in the Bronze Age — are still apparent in more than 2,000 stone monuments spread throughout the island.


The Talaiotic society left stone temples, burial chambers and monuments that resemble smaller versions of Stonehenge. Some of the larger clusters require tickets and have English guides in high season, but there are so many monuments that most aren’t even marked. You might stumble upon them while hiking along a walking path, hidden in tall grass. Taken together, they comprise one of Europe’s largest open-air museums.


The following millennia brought ever more visitors and invaders, including the Greeks, Moors, French and Catalans, but no outside culture has left a more lasting stamp than the British. They ruled the island intermittently during the 18th century and moved the capital to Mahon from Ciutadella, which had been founded before the Romans arrived but was destroyed in the 16th century by the Turks.


The English legacy shines through in the sash windows of Mahon’s architecture and in the active gin trade. The Xoriguer gin distillery is a cool spot for a pre-dinner tasting in Mahon, and I saw beach-friendly bottles of frozen gin and homemade lemonade frequently for sale, including at an ice cream shop in Cituadella.


FARM TO TABLE

Though beaches get all the limelight, much of Menorca’s economy is agricultural, evidenced by the fact that there are more cows than people. Small farms, separated into miniature parcels by dry stone walls, cover the rugged hills of the interior, producing a shocking variety of produce (40 types of apples, for instance), olive oil, wine and the delicious Mahon cheese.


The cheese even made it into my ice cream cone at Ambrosia in the capital — not cheesecake, but chunks of sharp, near-cheddar cheese mixed with vanilla ice cream. Somehow, it worked.


Menorca’s ecological sensibility resonates at spectacular restaurants in the atmospheric cities, which overlook natural harbors surrounded by battle-ready fortifications. In Ciutadella, check out Es Tast de na Silvia, the only Slow Food-certified restaurant in the Balearics. They serve updated takes on local dishes like fideua, a sort of seafood paella with noodles. Over the dining room, an arched stone ceiling is stamped with the year 1704.


Travelers’ checks

MENORCA: Through the winter, several airlines offer direct flights to Mahon from the Spanish mainland and several European capitals. In nice weather, overnight ferries from Barcelona are the insider’s way to go. Spanish and a dialect of Catalan called Menorquin are the local languages, but many people, especially in the tourism industry, speak some English.


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Water, fire and stone: Spain’s beguiling island of Menorca – News-Herald.com




The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.

The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.
Albert Stumm via AP





MENORCA, Spain >> Locals say Menorca can be reduced to three words: water, fire and stone.


The Spanish island’s three essential elements are embodied in Cova d’en Xoroi, a natural cave that houses a sophisticated lounge halfway down a cliff. As the sun dips into the Mediterranean, waves crash on the rocks below and selfie-snapping patrons burn the same roasted-orange color as the sun-bleached limestone. Then the staff lights torches under the craggy roof, and the stunning yet laid-back venue transitions into a lively night club.


Although the scene may sound as summery as a frozen mojito, it’s repeated nightly well into autumn, when Menorca remains as beguiling as it is in peak season. Through much of October, it’s still warm enough to enjoy the spectacular beaches, but visitors will find the island has plenty to offer besides sun and transparent blue waters.


Here’s a quick look at Menorca and its vibrant cities, Mahon and Ciutadella, at a time of year when you just might have them to yourself.



NATURE VS. NURTURE

Menorca is the farthest east of the Balearics, an archipelago between Spain and Italy that includes the better-known islands of Mallorca and jet-set Ibiza. All three enjoy an enviably mild climate in a picture-postcard setting, but Menorca’s comes without the crowds or the 50-euro club cover charges. It has managed to hold on to an understated, calmer style by restricting development to a few existing, mostly low-rise resorts.


The entire 270-square-mile island was declared a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1993, and as a result, most of the 125 beaches that encircle Menorca’s jagged coastline have very little, if any, development.


Along the south coast, walking paths that start at inland parking lots wind through forested ravines to the beaches. Cala Mitjana’s powdery white sand is surrounded by cliffs, and the calm, shallow water makes it easy to explore a cave and the rocky crags with snorkeling gear. In the north, Cala Cavalleria is a little easier to get to but no less unspoiled.


The water may feel warm into autumn, but visiting after the peak summer months also means paying half-price for activities like hiring a boat with a private captain. Just plan ahead and check the weather for wind as well as temperatures.


CULTURAL LEGACIES

The ancient Phoenicians called it “Nura,” or the Island of Fire. Legend has it that passing sailors saw bonfires built along the southern cliffs, which the original inhabitants used to signal each other. Signs of those first settlers — Iberian tribes that came from the mainland in the Bronze Age — are still apparent in more than 2,000 stone monuments spread throughout the island.


The Talaiotic society left stone temples, burial chambers and monuments that resemble smaller versions of Stonehenge. Some of the larger clusters require tickets and have English guides in high season, but there are so many monuments that most aren’t even marked. You might stumble upon them while hiking along a walking path, hidden in tall grass. Taken together, they comprise one of Europe’s largest open-air museums.


The following millennia brought ever more visitors and invaders, including the Greeks, Moors, French and Catalans, but no outside culture has left a more lasting stamp than the British. They ruled the island intermittently during the 18th century and moved the capital to Mahon from Ciutadella, which had been founded before the Romans arrived but was destroyed in the 16th century by the Turks.


The English legacy shines through in the sash windows of Mahon’s architecture and in the active gin trade. The Xoriguer gin distillery is a cool spot for a pre-dinner tasting in Mahon, and I saw beach-friendly bottles of frozen gin and homemade lemonade frequently for sale, including at an ice cream shop in Cituadella.


FARM TO TABLE

Though beaches get all the limelight, much of Menorca’s economy is agricultural, evidenced by the fact that there are more cows than people. Small farms, separated into miniature parcels by dry stone walls, cover the rugged hills of the interior, producing a shocking variety of produce (40 types of apples, for instance), olive oil, wine and the delicious Mahon cheese.


The cheese even made it into my ice cream cone at Ambrosia in the capital — not cheesecake, but chunks of sharp, near-cheddar cheese mixed with vanilla ice cream. Somehow, it worked.


Menorca’s ecological sensibility resonates at spectacular restaurants in the atmospheric cities, which overlook natural harbors surrounded by battle-ready fortifications. In Ciutadella, check out Es Tast de na Silvia, the only Slow Food-certified restaurant in the Balearics. They serve updated takes on local dishes like fideua, a sort of seafood paella with noodles. Over the dining room, an arched stone ceiling is stamped with the year 1704.


Travelers’ checks

MENORCA: Through the winter, several airlines offer direct flights to Mahon from the Spanish mainland and several European capitals. In nice weather, overnight ferries from Barcelona are the insider’s way to go. Spanish and a dialect of Catalan called Menorquin are the local languages, but many people, especially in the tourism industry, speak some English.


Find great apartments in menorca.

Water, fire and stone: Spain’s beguiling island of Menorca – News-Herald.com




The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.

The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.
Albert Stumm via AP





MENORCA, Spain >> Locals say Menorca can be reduced to three words: water, fire and stone.


The Spanish island’s three essential elements are embodied in Cova d’en Xoroi, a natural cave that houses a sophisticated lounge halfway down a cliff. As the sun dips into the Mediterranean, waves crash on the rocks below and selfie-snapping patrons burn the same roasted-orange color as the sun-bleached limestone. Then the staff lights torches under the craggy roof, and the stunning yet laid-back venue transitions into a lively night club.


Although the scene may sound as summery as a frozen mojito, it’s repeated nightly well into autumn, when Menorca remains as beguiling as it is in peak season. Through much of October, it’s still warm enough to enjoy the spectacular beaches, but visitors will find the island has plenty to offer besides sun and transparent blue waters.


Here’s a quick look at Menorca and its vibrant cities, Mahon and Ciutadella, at a time of year when you just might have them to yourself.



NATURE VS. NURTURE

Menorca is the farthest east of the Balearics, an archipelago between Spain and Italy that includes the better-known islands of Mallorca and jet-set Ibiza. All three enjoy an enviably mild climate in a picture-postcard setting, but Menorca’s comes without the crowds or the 50-euro club cover charges. It has managed to hold on to an understated, calmer style by restricting development to a few existing, mostly low-rise resorts.


The entire 270-square-mile island was declared a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1993, and as a result, most of the 125 beaches that encircle Menorca’s jagged coastline have very little, if any, development.


Along the south coast, walking paths that start at inland parking lots wind through forested ravines to the beaches. Cala Mitjana’s powdery white sand is surrounded by cliffs, and the calm, shallow water makes it easy to explore a cave and the rocky crags with snorkeling gear. In the north, Cala Cavalleria is a little easier to get to but no less unspoiled.


The water may feel warm into autumn, but visiting after the peak summer months also means paying half-price for activities like hiring a boat with a private captain. Just plan ahead and check the weather for wind as well as temperatures.


CULTURAL LEGACIES

The ancient Phoenicians called it “Nura,” or the Island of Fire. Legend has it that passing sailors saw bonfires built along the southern cliffs, which the original inhabitants used to signal each other. Signs of those first settlers — Iberian tribes that came from the mainland in the Bronze Age — are still apparent in more than 2,000 stone monuments spread throughout the island.


The Talaiotic society left stone temples, burial chambers and monuments that resemble smaller versions of Stonehenge. Some of the larger clusters require tickets and have English guides in high season, but there are so many monuments that most aren’t even marked. You might stumble upon them while hiking along a walking path, hidden in tall grass. Taken together, they comprise one of Europe’s largest open-air museums.


The following millennia brought ever more visitors and invaders, including the Greeks, Moors, French and Catalans, but no outside culture has left a more lasting stamp than the British. They ruled the island intermittently during the 18th century and moved the capital to Mahon from Ciutadella, which had been founded before the Romans arrived but was destroyed in the 16th century by the Turks.


The English legacy shines through in the sash windows of Mahon’s architecture and in the active gin trade. The Xoriguer gin distillery is a cool spot for a pre-dinner tasting in Mahon, and I saw beach-friendly bottles of frozen gin and homemade lemonade frequently for sale, including at an ice cream shop in Cituadella.


FARM TO TABLE

Though beaches get all the limelight, much of Menorca’s economy is agricultural, evidenced by the fact that there are more cows than people. Small farms, separated into miniature parcels by dry stone walls, cover the rugged hills of the interior, producing a shocking variety of produce (40 types of apples, for instance), olive oil, wine and the delicious Mahon cheese.


The cheese even made it into my ice cream cone at Ambrosia in the capital — not cheesecake, but chunks of sharp, near-cheddar cheese mixed with vanilla ice cream. Somehow, it worked.


Menorca’s ecological sensibility resonates at spectacular restaurants in the atmospheric cities, which overlook natural harbors surrounded by battle-ready fortifications. In Ciutadella, check out Es Tast de na Silvia, the only Slow Food-certified restaurant in the Balearics. They serve updated takes on local dishes like fideua, a sort of seafood paella with noodles. Over the dining room, an arched stone ceiling is stamped with the year 1704.


Travelers’ checks

MENORCA: Through the winter, several airlines offer direct flights to Mahon from the Spanish mainland and several European capitals. In nice weather, overnight ferries from Barcelona are the insider’s way to go. Spanish and a dialect of Catalan called Menorquin are the local languages, but many people, especially in the tourism industry, speak some English.


Find great apartments in menorca.

Water, fire and stone: Spain’s beguiling island of Menorca – News-Herald.com




The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.

The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.
Albert Stumm via AP





MENORCA, Spain >> Locals say Menorca can be reduced to three words: water, fire and stone.


The Spanish island’s three essential elements are embodied in Cova d’en Xoroi, a natural cave that houses a sophisticated lounge halfway down a cliff. As the sun dips into the Mediterranean, waves crash on the rocks below and selfie-snapping patrons burn the same roasted-orange color as the sun-bleached limestone. Then the staff lights torches under the craggy roof, and the stunning yet laid-back venue transitions into a lively night club.


Although the scene may sound as summery as a frozen mojito, it’s repeated nightly well into autumn, when Menorca remains as beguiling as it is in peak season. Through much of October, it’s still warm enough to enjoy the spectacular beaches, but visitors will find the island has plenty to offer besides sun and transparent blue waters.


Here’s a quick look at Menorca and its vibrant cities, Mahon and Ciutadella, at a time of year when you just might have them to yourself.



NATURE VS. NURTURE

Menorca is the farthest east of the Balearics, an archipelago between Spain and Italy that includes the better-known islands of Mallorca and jet-set Ibiza. All three enjoy an enviably mild climate in a picture-postcard setting, but Menorca’s comes without the crowds or the 50-euro club cover charges. It has managed to hold on to an understated, calmer style by restricting development to a few existing, mostly low-rise resorts.


The entire 270-square-mile island was declared a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1993, and as a result, most of the 125 beaches that encircle Menorca’s jagged coastline have very little, if any, development.


Along the south coast, walking paths that start at inland parking lots wind through forested ravines to the beaches. Cala Mitjana’s powdery white sand is surrounded by cliffs, and the calm, shallow water makes it easy to explore a cave and the rocky crags with snorkeling gear. In the north, Cala Cavalleria is a little easier to get to but no less unspoiled.


The water may feel warm into autumn, but visiting after the peak summer months also means paying half-price for activities like hiring a boat with a private captain. Just plan ahead and check the weather for wind as well as temperatures.


CULTURAL LEGACIES

The ancient Phoenicians called it “Nura,” or the Island of Fire. Legend has it that passing sailors saw bonfires built along the southern cliffs, which the original inhabitants used to signal each other. Signs of those first settlers — Iberian tribes that came from the mainland in the Bronze Age — are still apparent in more than 2,000 stone monuments spread throughout the island.


The Talaiotic society left stone temples, burial chambers and monuments that resemble smaller versions of Stonehenge. Some of the larger clusters require tickets and have English guides in high season, but there are so many monuments that most aren’t even marked. You might stumble upon them while hiking along a walking path, hidden in tall grass. Taken together, they comprise one of Europe’s largest open-air museums.


The following millennia brought ever more visitors and invaders, including the Greeks, Moors, French and Catalans, but no outside culture has left a more lasting stamp than the British. They ruled the island intermittently during the 18th century and moved the capital to Mahon from Ciutadella, which had been founded before the Romans arrived but was destroyed in the 16th century by the Turks.


The English legacy shines through in the sash windows of Mahon’s architecture and in the active gin trade. The Xoriguer gin distillery is a cool spot for a pre-dinner tasting in Mahon, and I saw beach-friendly bottles of frozen gin and homemade lemonade frequently for sale, including at an ice cream shop in Cituadella.


FARM TO TABLE

Though beaches get all the limelight, much of Menorca’s economy is agricultural, evidenced by the fact that there are more cows than people. Small farms, separated into miniature parcels by dry stone walls, cover the rugged hills of the interior, producing a shocking variety of produce (40 types of apples, for instance), olive oil, wine and the delicious Mahon cheese.


The cheese even made it into my ice cream cone at Ambrosia in the capital — not cheesecake, but chunks of sharp, near-cheddar cheese mixed with vanilla ice cream. Somehow, it worked.


Menorca’s ecological sensibility resonates at spectacular restaurants in the atmospheric cities, which overlook natural harbors surrounded by battle-ready fortifications. In Ciutadella, check out Es Tast de na Silvia, the only Slow Food-certified restaurant in the Balearics. They serve updated takes on local dishes like fideua, a sort of seafood paella with noodles. Over the dining room, an arched stone ceiling is stamped with the year 1704.


Travelers’ checks

MENORCA: Through the winter, several airlines offer direct flights to Mahon from the Spanish mainland and several European capitals. In nice weather, overnight ferries from Barcelona are the insider’s way to go. Spanish and a dialect of Catalan called Menorquin are the local languages, but many people, especially in the tourism industry, speak some English.


Find great apartments in menorca.

Water, fire and stone: Spain’s beguiling island of Menorca – News-Herald.com




The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.

The calm waters off Cala Mitjana on the island of Menorca, Spain, are great for snorkeling.
Albert Stumm via AP





MENORCA, Spain >> Locals say Menorca can be reduced to three words: water, fire and stone.


The Spanish island’s three essential elements are embodied in Cova d’en Xoroi, a natural cave that houses a sophisticated lounge halfway down a cliff. As the sun dips into the Mediterranean, waves crash on the rocks below and selfie-snapping patrons burn the same roasted-orange color as the sun-bleached limestone. Then the staff lights torches under the craggy roof, and the stunning yet laid-back venue transitions into a lively night club.


Although the scene may sound as summery as a frozen mojito, it’s repeated nightly well into autumn, when Menorca remains as beguiling as it is in peak season. Through much of October, it’s still warm enough to enjoy the spectacular beaches, but visitors will find the island has plenty to offer besides sun and transparent blue waters.


Here’s a quick look at Menorca and its vibrant cities, Mahon and Ciutadella, at a time of year when you just might have them to yourself.



NATURE VS. NURTURE

Menorca is the farthest east of the Balearics, an archipelago between Spain and Italy that includes the better-known islands of Mallorca and jet-set Ibiza. All three enjoy an enviably mild climate in a picture-postcard setting, but Menorca’s comes without the crowds or the 50-euro club cover charges. It has managed to hold on to an understated, calmer style by restricting development to a few existing, mostly low-rise resorts.


The entire 270-square-mile island was declared a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1993, and as a result, most of the 125 beaches that encircle Menorca’s jagged coastline have very little, if any, development.


Along the south coast, walking paths that start at inland parking lots wind through forested ravines to the beaches. Cala Mitjana’s powdery white sand is surrounded by cliffs, and the calm, shallow water makes it easy to explore a cave and the rocky crags with snorkeling gear. In the north, Cala Cavalleria is a little easier to get to but no less unspoiled.


The water may feel warm into autumn, but visiting after the peak summer months also means paying half-price for activities like hiring a boat with a private captain. Just plan ahead and check the weather for wind as well as temperatures.


CULTURAL LEGACIES

The ancient Phoenicians called it “Nura,” or the Island of Fire. Legend has it that passing sailors saw bonfires built along the southern cliffs, which the original inhabitants used to signal each other. Signs of those first settlers — Iberian tribes that came from the mainland in the Bronze Age — are still apparent in more than 2,000 stone monuments spread throughout the island.


The Talaiotic society left stone temples, burial chambers and monuments that resemble smaller versions of Stonehenge. Some of the larger clusters require tickets and have English guides in high season, but there are so many monuments that most aren’t even marked. You might stumble upon them while hiking along a walking path, hidden in tall grass. Taken together, they comprise one of Europe’s largest open-air museums.


The following millennia brought ever more visitors and invaders, including the Greeks, Moors, French and Catalans, but no outside culture has left a more lasting stamp than the British. They ruled the island intermittently during the 18th century and moved the capital to Mahon from Ciutadella, which had been founded before the Romans arrived but was destroyed in the 16th century by the Turks.


The English legacy shines through in the sash windows of Mahon’s architecture and in the active gin trade. The Xoriguer gin distillery is a cool spot for a pre-dinner tasting in Mahon, and I saw beach-friendly bottles of frozen gin and homemade lemonade frequently for sale, including at an ice cream shop in Cituadella.


FARM TO TABLE

Though beaches get all the limelight, much of Menorca’s economy is agricultural, evidenced by the fact that there are more cows than people. Small farms, separated into miniature parcels by dry stone walls, cover the rugged hills of the interior, producing a shocking variety of produce (40 types of apples, for instance), olive oil, wine and the delicious Mahon cheese.


The cheese even made it into my ice cream cone at Ambrosia in the capital — not cheesecake, but chunks of sharp, near-cheddar cheese mixed with vanilla ice cream. Somehow, it worked.


Menorca’s ecological sensibility resonates at spectacular restaurants in the atmospheric cities, which overlook natural harbors surrounded by battle-ready fortifications. In Ciutadella, check out Es Tast de na Silvia, the only Slow Food-certified restaurant in the Balearics. They serve updated takes on local dishes like fideua, a sort of seafood paella with noodles. Over the dining room, an arched stone ceiling is stamped with the year 1704.


Travelers’ checks

MENORCA: Through the winter, several airlines offer direct flights to Mahon from the Spanish mainland and several European capitals. In nice weather, overnight ferries from Barcelona are the insider’s way to go. Spanish and a dialect of Catalan called Menorquin are the local languages, but many people, especially in the tourism industry, speak some English.


Find great apartments in menorca.